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Plenary speakers

Juan Carlos Seijo:  ‘Community co-management of metapopulations with source-sink configuration: The small-scale spiny lobster (Panulirus argus) fishery of Punta Allen, Mexico’  

Monday, September 22nd, 9-10:30
Plenary 1: Viability, livelihoods and well-being
Location: Regency 

Talk: Management and conservation of the spiny lobster fisheries of the West Central Atlantic involve the following complexities: (i) it is a transboundary resource, (ii) it is characterized by a metapopulation with source-sink configuration, (iii) gears and fishing methods are heterogeneous with differing effects on population structure, and (iv) the heterogeneity in manJuan Carlos Seijoagement strategies, regulations (including differing legal sizes and trade restrictions), and enforcement. The metapopulation connectivity imposes management difficulties because not all of the countries involved in the Caribbean ecosystem implement the same regulatory strategies for responsible use of this resource over time. Within this complex context, the Punta Allen fishing community has co-managed the resource with a history of sound decision making.  Factors identified to explain the relative success of the Punta Allen spiny lobster fishery will be presented and discussed.

Bio:  Juan Carlos Seijo is a Professor of fisheries bioeconomics, and natural resource economics at Universidad Marista de Mérida, (founding President of this University, 1996-2004), and FAO consultant for 25 years.  He has taught fisheries bioeconomics courses in Chile, Argentina, Peru, Uruguay, Panamá, Colombia, Cuba, Guatemala, Venezuela, and Taiwan. He has also been visiting professor of the University of Stirling, The University of Delaware, and Oceanic University of Taiwan. He has participated by invitation of FAO, UNESCO, National Geographic, and other institutions in scientific expert consultation and meetings in Sweeden, Australia, Italy, Mauritius, Barbados, Cambodi, Denmark, Norway, and USA. He has been President of the North American Association of Fisheries Economists (NAAFE-2011-2013), and Board member of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade (IIFET-2008-2012). His academic interests and publications deal with fisheries bioeconomics, decision theory and risk analysis, and spatial modeling and analysis of small-scale fisheries.


Christina Hicks:   ‘Social, institutional, and knowledge access mediate diverse ecosystem service benefits in small-scale fisheries’ 

Monday, September 22nd, 9-10:30
Plenary 1: Viability, livelihoods and well-being
Location: Regency

Talk: Fisheries management often results in trade-offs that influence who benefits, or what they benefit from. An understanding of when and why these trade-offs in ecosystem services occur can contribute towards effective and equitable fisheries management. Using examples from coral reef fisheries in the western Indian Ocean, Christina Hicks’ research explores the following questions: 1) what trade-offs emerge among people and ecosystem services? and, 2) what influences who can benefit from these ecosystem services? Her results identify common trade-offs across stakeholder group (managers vs fishers), scale (local vs national benefits), and category (cultural vs provisioning). Further, she shows how access, and in particular social, institutional, and knowledge mechanisms (rather than rights or economic mechanisms), influences who is able to benefit and what benefits Christina Hicksthey perceive.

Bio: Christina is an interdisciplinary social science fellow at Stanford University’s Center for Ocean Solutions and James Cook University’s Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies. Christina’s research examines how resource dependent communities value and benefit from their environment (popularized as ecosystem services). By taking people’s values, and other social characteristics into consideration, this work develops an understanding of how people are likely to respond to environmental and policy change. Christina earned her PhD from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, JCU, Australia, and her MSc from Newcastle University, UK. Christina has previously worked as a research associate in the UK and a fisheries scientist in Kenya; she now has more than 10 years of experience working in small-scale fisheries, predominantly in the developing world.

 


Tim Acott: ‘Understanding the importance of small-scale fisheries’  

Monday, September 22nd, 9-10:30
Plenary 1: Viability, livelihoods and well-being
Location: Regency

Talk: The livelihoods of small-scale fishermen are under threat in many places across the world. This threat is set against a backdrop of a reported global fisheries ‘crisis’ with 73% of marine stocks reported as either fully exploited, overexploited, depleted or recovering. The focus of fisheries management has often been on the biological and economic dimensions and arguably not enough attention has been given to socio-cultural issues. Capturing the importance of small-scale fisheries from a socio-cultural perspective is not an easy task and requires a range of epistemological perspectives and methodological approaches. Using examples from the development of ‘21st Century Catch’ (a toolkit developed to help understand the importance of small-scale fisheries1) Tim AcoTim Acotttt will present insights into developing and using multi-dimensional and multi-disciplinary perspectives for capturing the value of fisheries for the well-being of coastal communities. For such initiatives to succeed, from grassroots to strategic policy planning, attention needs to be given to epistemological considerations of acceptable evidence that in turn means addressing issues of the relationship between nature and culture. Tim will address these issues with a focus on small-scale fisheries, cultural ecosystem services and sense of place.

Bio: Dr. Tim Acott is a Principal Lecturer in Environmental Geography at the University of Greenwich in the Faculty of Science and Engineering. He graduated with a BSc Hons in Environmental Science from the University of Plymouth in 1989 and subsequently completed a PhD at the University of Stirling. His academic interests revolve around social science perspectives on environment and sustainability issues. Tim has led work on three major EU funded fisheries projects, CHARM, GIFS and TourFish, and is a lead author on the recently published toolkit for inshore fisheries called ‘21st Century Catch’. Tim is currently working on new ways to understand inshore fisheries through cultural ecosystem services and sense of place from a co-constructionist perspective.


Daniel Pauly:  ‘Small-scale fisheries: A global reassessment of their catches’ 

Monday, September 22nd, 13:30-15:00 
Plenary 2: Assessment, sustainability and stewardship 
Location: Regency 

Talk: It is widely understood that the only global fisheries statistics that are currently available, i.e., the data submitted by member countries to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) underestimate the contribution of small-scale fisheries (artisanal, subsistence and recreational), but the extent of this underestimation has never been rigorously assessed. The Sea Around Us, as part of its goal of quantifying human impacts on global marine ecosystems undertook, and has now concluded, a twelve-year activity wherein the fisheCongrès ABQ Pauly Daniel 1102ries catches by sector of all maritime countries of the world were reconstructed from the bottom up, for the years 1950 to 2010. Dr. Pauly will present selected results from this effort, which allow for re-assessments of the global role of small-scale fisheries in contributing food security, and their relationship vis-à-vis  industrial fisheries.

Bio: Dr. Daniel Pauly is a Professor at the Fisheries Centre of the University of British Columbia (in Vancouver, Canada), of which he was the Director from 2003 to 2008. Since 1999, he is also Principal Investigator of the Sea Around Us project, devoted to studying documenting and mitigating the impact of industrial fishing on the world’s marine ecosystems. The concepts, methods and software Daniel Pauly (co-)developed, documented in over 500 heavily-cited publications, are used throughout the world, following multiple courses and workshops given in four languages on all five continents. This applies especially to the ELEFAN software for fish growth analysis, the Ecopath approach for modelling aquatic ecosystems and FishBase, the online encyclopedia of fishes. This, work is recognized in various profiles, notably in Science, Nature and the New York Times, and by numerous awards, notably the International Cosmos Prize (Japan, 2005), the Volvo Environmental Prize, (Sweden, 2006), the Ramon Margalef Prize (Spain, 2008) and the Nierenberg Prize for Science in the Public Interest (US, 2012). His work also led to Dr. Pauly receiving 6 honorary doctorates and being elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada (Academy of Science).


Derek Armitage: ‘Governance and community conservation in coastal-marine contexts and the implications for small-scale fisheries’ 

Monday, September 22nd, 13:30-15:00
Plenary 2: Assessment, sustainability and stewardship
L
ocation: Regency 

Talk: New ways of governing in relation to the environment are emerging with important implications for the practice of conservation. In particular, understanding how community conservation is influencing and being influenced by emergent hybrid (e.g., public-private) and network governance arrangements is particularly important. In his talk Dr. Armitage will explore: 1) how different and hybrid governance arrangements might promote community conservation in ways that sustain in particular the well-being of small-scale fishers and the ecosystem services upon which they depend; 2) whether the interests of local resource users (e.g, small-scale fishers) iArmitage 2014n conservation practices are matched by meaningful involvement in decision processes at multiple levels; and 3) how governance processes emerging in complex conservation situations might be adaptive to social-ecological change and uncertainty.

Bio: Derek Armitage is Associate Professor, University of Waterloo where he directs the Environmental Change and Governance Group (http://ecgg.uwaterloo.ca). He serves as an editor for Conservation Letters and Ecology and Society and is a Senior Fellow with the Earth Systems Governance Project.


Karin Fernando: ‘How BIG are small-scale fishers in the Port 2015 development agenda ‘ 

Monday, September 22nd, 13:30-15:00 
Plenary 2: Assessment, sustainability and stewardship 
Location: Regency

Talk: On the road to designing and deliberating the next development framework that will replace the existing Millennium Development goals (MDGs) in 2015, a lengthy consultative route is underway. The objectives of these discussions have been to propose an “ambitious” and “transformative” agenda by which the world can tackle poverty eradication.  The main thrust of the overall framework and goals is based on bringing about a sustainable development model.  It is currently at the final stages of formulation before the United Nations convenes the negotiation process with the Governments in September 2014. From this point on it is vital that stakeholders and lobby groups work with their governments to include areas of vitaPicture1l importance into the agenda especially to ensure that “no one is left behind” and that the frame is truly transformative.  This presentation will provide a snap shot of the proposed goals (both the Millennium Development Goals and the Sustainable development Goals) and discuss how small scale fishers, their needs and issues are being incorporated into this framework. It will also bring out positions made by groups or others who are working on fisheries related issues. The presentation will be based on the ongoing debates and position papers related to the MDG and SDG processes. It will focus more on concerns for small scale fishers in developing countries, particularly South Asia.

Bio: Karin Fernando (MA Brandeis), is a Senior Professional at the Centre for Poverty Analysis (CEPA) where she leads the Poverty Impact Monitoring programme and the thematic work on the Environment and Poverty. Her interests are in natural resource management, sustainable development and poverty.


Alejandro Flores: ‘Rights to food, food security and small-scale fisheries: Concepts and linkages ‘ 

Tuesday, September 23rd, 09-10:30 
Plenary 3: Food, rights and governance  
Location: Regency

Talk: The right to food was reaffirmed by heads of states and governments in 1996 through the declaration of the World Food Summit, stating that it is everyone´s right to be free of hunger and to have access to safe and nutritious food. This summit also recognized the urgent need to advocate and make every effort to reach food security, which was defined as the condition in which all persons have permanent access to sufficient safe and nutritious foods to satisfy daily dietary needs to have a healthy and active life. Within the context of improving food security, the provision of fish as a main source of protein already plays a paramount role in many countries around the world, particularly those of Asia and the Pacific Island States. Other regions sunnameduch as Africa, where undernourishment is still a major problem, SSF and SS-aquaculture though offering a high potential for its reduction, still face many technical and legal problems. In Latin America, where some 47 million people are still chronically hungry, the potential of SSF is still hampered by weak institutional sectorial arrangements. However, increased recognition of the importance to safeguard food rights and food security in these regions, is beginning to include SSF and SSAq within right to food and food security legislations and policies.

Bio: Alejandro Flores has a degree in Fisheries Engineering  from Veracruz, Mexico, Msc in Aquaculture and Fisheries Management and a PhD in Aquaculture, both from University of Stirling, UK. He has been a Full Professor; Head of the Marine Resources Department and Director of the Center for Research and Advanced Studies (CINVESTAV), at Merida, Mexico. He is the founding Director of the School of Natural Resources and Rector of the Marista University of Merida, Mexico. He has been a representative of FAO-UN in Argentina and Chile and  the Senior Fishery and Aquaculture Officer of FAO´s Regional Office for Latin America and the Caribbean.


Tanya King: ‘The health and well-being of fishers in Australia’ 

Tuesday, September 23rd, 09-10:30 
Plenary 3: Food, rights and governance  
Location: Regency

Talk: The health and well-being of fishers in Australia – as elsewhere – is complicated by many factors that are specific to the industry. This presentation describes a research project in which the indusTanya Kingtry attitude to physical and mental health issues are explored. The project makes a number of distinctions that help to clarify the challenges to fisher health and well-being, including the difference between ‘symptoms’ and ‘stressors’, as well as between stressors that are ‘traditional risks’ and those that are ‘modern uncertainties’.

Bio: Tanya King is a maritime anthropologist who works with small-scale Australian commercial fishermen. Her focus is on the creation, implementation and justification of natural resource management policy, and how this is encountered by those who make a living from the sea. Her current research explores the relationship between policy tools and fisher mental health outcomes.


Hugh Govan: ‘Co-management of coastal fisheries in the Pacific Islands: Defining roles and prioritizing actions to move forward’ 

Tuesday, September 23rd, 09-10:30 
Plenary 3: Food, rights and governance  
Location: Regency

Talk: The importance of coastal fisheries in the Pacific Islands, while self-evident, is only slowly being recognized in regional and national policies.  Community-based management has long been identified as a fundamental building block and large scale uptake of these approaches have been demonstrated by the LMMA Network across more than 500 communities. But in a region witPicture1h nearly 10,000 such communities there is an urgent need for coherent national approaches to small-scale fisheries management. While lack of policy, capacity and finance are often proposed as obstacles to progress this presentation explores experiences in strategic implementation that look promising for providing core national fisheries management services within existing constraints.

Bio: Hugh was born in Scotland, raised in Spain and has lived in Solomon Islands, Central and South America, and currently, Fiji.  He advises the Locally Managed Marine Area Network in Asia and the Pacific and works free-lance on policy as well as practice to develop appropriate collaborative management approaches and build institutional and human capacity. His current interests are developing national and provincial government systems to supported decentralized natural resource management and improving his surfing: http://tauika.net/publications.htm.


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